Damage User Manual Part 2 – Digieffects

DIGIEFFECTS / DAMAGE USER MANUAL PART 2 /


Damage User Manual Part 2

Destabilize 

Destabilize is an effect that is useful for emulating a practical camera shake or a more conceptual effect for motion graphics work involving separate color channel alpha compositing and color channel separation.

Deinterlace  

Deinterlace control offers a simple method for eliminating fields by interpolating one of the two fields (or both) to create a non-interlaced, progressive output. The following modes are available:

  • None- Does not deinterlace the effect input 
  • Lower/Upper Only- Only uses either field (i.e. half a frame worth of information) to create a whole, progressive frame.
  • Merge- Create a progressive frame for each field, then combine the both. This is most useful for introducing a filmic look to an interlaced composition containing slowly moving objects.

Color Control

  • Enable Alpha Composite – There are three separate values for adjusting the alpha composite when the Enable Alpha Composite is checked, one each for the red, green and blue channels.  
  • R,G and B Adjust- values differ from the source blend control not only in the fact that the color channels are handled separately, but that the values range from -100 to +100, the negative values effectively subtracting the color channel information from the composited image. This, when used with the Channel Separation controls, can create effects that would be reminiscent of certain decades experienced while ingesting certain substances.

Motion Control 

(Many Motion Control parameters have separate adjustments for Horizontal, Vertical, Zoom, Rotation and Channel Separation self-animated functions.  Obviously when the individual values vary somewhat across the separate adjustments, it adds more random movements, which is typically desirable when imitating human body unsteadiness for a ‘camera shake’ aesthetic.)

  • Maximum - Setting the maximum value determines the amount of maximum movement generated from the effect.  The unit scale is based on percentage of the image dimension, therefore a value of 100 means the image will move 100% of its full width/height.  In the case of rotation, the value is in degrees of rotation.
  • Frequency - Frequency controls how often the oscillation of the effect happens in a given period of time.  Frequency values are in Hertz, or the number of times per second. A value of 1 denotes one full cycle per second, 2 is twice per second, etc.  When the frequency values differ across the individual adjustments for each of the axes of movement, the overall effect gets more randomly erratic.
  • Amplitude - The amplitude value controls the amount of modulation of the oscillation function that will form the ‘engine’ behind your self-animating properties.  This value multiplies the Maximum value ( An Amplitude value of .5 would diminish the max value by half, a value of 2 would double it, etc.)
  • Phase - Phase is the ‘timing’ of the the modulation of the sine wave used to generate the oscillation for that property…to achieve the most random looking effect, vary the horizontal, vertical and zoom phase values. (Keep in mind that -720, -360, 0, and +360, +720 are effectively the same values.)  The phase values across all the individual adjustments will create a fairly predictable movement cycle…creating subtle differences across these values will create a bit more randomness (and therefore a bit more believability) in the ‘camera shake’ aesthetic.
  • Erratic - Since the effect’s self-animation ‘engine’ is driven by sine wave generators, having those changes become predictable in its cycling behavior is a danger.  Erratic-ness might be characterized as the bucket of marbles dumped out in front of the marching band of an orderly modulating sine wave.
  • Zoom Base - To keep the image from ‘shaking’ itself out of the video overlay (which really torpedos the idea of the aesthetic of a ‘camera shake’), increasing this value will ‘zoom into’ the source image to allow for more movement without the edges becoming visible.
  • Zoom Factor - Scale the zoom movement using the zoom factor…a value of ‘1’ represents a variance of approximately +/-10%, and incresing this value will allow a larger range of variance.
  • Channel Separation - The ‘Channel Separate’ value defines how much separation’ you allow between the Red, Green and Blue channels.  The Frequency, Amplitude, and Phase controls’ behavior is defined in the general notes above…  At smaller values, the effect can simulate chromatic aberrations.

Advanced

The Erratic controls under 'Advanced' can be used to 'dampen' the aggregate effect of multiple erratic properties in other settings, which can be excessive.  Negative values invert the waveform that drives the erratic function.

Interference 

Interference is a unique effect inside Digieffects Damage because of its ability to give the impression that your video clip is interlaced and being displayed on a Cathode Ray Tube monitor. This system of scanning two ‘fields’ of horizontal lines (each field made up of every other line in the image, usually referred to as “Upper/Lower”, “Odd/Even”, or even “A/B”) to make each ‘frame’ of video is both a form of analog video compression, and the reason why interlaced video motion looks smoother than progressive video or film motion. 

This effect will be particularly useful for effects you want to specifically portray inexpensive television receivers or stereotypical industrial video camera signals.  Each field’s attributes can be handled individually, simulating an image that’s created electronically from scan lines.

Fields Setup

  • Size – Set the vertical size for each ‘field’ here.  A very effective way to utilize this parameter is to set one field for a height of one and set its Luminance setting relatively dark creating the ‘border’ between the ‘scanlines’, while using the other ‘field’ for your picture content with a size setting of 2-4.
  • Process Input – While the Source Blend value controls the overall ratio between the unaffected source image vs. the effect-processed image, the Process Input controls how much of the source image gets processed in each of the two pipelines (one for E and one for O).
  • Luminance – This value influences the luminance level of each ‘field’ independently.  Setting the two fields for different values will accentuate the ‘scanline’ look of your results.
  • Tint – Check the box to Tint your video to help create effects like simulated night vision.
  • Tint Color – Pick the color of your Tint using the eyedropper or pick from the palette from clicking on the color swatch.

Noise

  • Noise Level – Add noise to the effect by increasing this value.
  • Chroma Noise – Check the Chroma Noise tomake your noise multicolored.
  • Decay Amount – Decay Amount controls the number of re-processing or feedback-loop of the effect. Higher value here means the processed image gets its color values ‘dirtied’ even further, where much of the information in the mid- to hi range getting lost. Imagine running a photocopy of a photocopy again and again…or possibly a VHS dub of a dub.  The effect is highly-dependent on source footage, but usually causes some blooming of mid- and highlights.
  • Smear –When Distorted image is present (see the Modulation section), it is fed back into the re-processing loop. The effect gets especially interesting when there are subtle, varying amounts of distortion at medium to high Decay Amount values.

Modulation

  • Distortion Method – There are several modes of distorting of image available.
  • Shift translates the entire ‘field’ (as defined by your E and O settings) to the right, that can be used to simulate transmission delay, for example.
  • Linear applies linearly-varying amounts of shift from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen. Basically, you will see a diagonally stretched image.  
  • Sawtooth mode applies a sawtooth-wave to vary the amount of left-right shifting of ‘scanlines’.  
  • Noisy mode is very random, such that each scanline is translated left-right by highly random values.  
  • Wave mode is similar to Sawtooth, except that the waveform is more rounded.
  • Horiz. Adj. – Controls the extent of left-right modulation, as defined by the mode above. High values here combined with high Influence result in the greatest distortion. 
  • Influence –  Influence affects the Horizonal shifting as defined above, but depends on the Distortion Mode. At zero, there will be no shifting at all.  Low Influence values mean the modulation effect will be subtle, even if the Horizontal Adjustment values are high.  In some of these modes, you can think of Influence as the ‘Coarse’ value control with Horizontal Adjustment being the ‘Fine’ control.
  • In Shift Distortion mode,  Influence amplifies the Horizontal Adjustment value, so a low value here counteracts Horizontal Adjustment value, while a high value exaggerates it.  Similarly in Linear Distortion mode, Influence adjusts the ‘slope’ of the diagonal stretching by interacting with the Horizontal Adjustment value.  Also, in Noisy Distortion mode, Influence tends to exaggerate the horizontal shifting by complementing the Horizontal Adjustment value.  In Wave and Sawtooth Distortion modes, Influence controls the up-and down-ness of the waves.
  • Comb Filter Level – In signal processing, a comb filter is typically employed to combine a visual signal with a delayed version of itself to maximize perceived image quality through the construction of the two versions of the image while the destructive interference caused by the combining of the two tend to “smooth” out some details that aren’t always deemed visually desirable.  The effect of the comb filters in Interference are controlled by this value.  To maximize the horizontal scanline look, try to run one field’s comb filter at max value (20) and the other field at minimum (0).

OverExpose

OverExpose is an excellent way to add a sense of dynamic to otherwise stable and predictable footage.  Using the effect in a practical way can result in a feeling of a sort of focus-hunt and iris-hunt that happens with consumer camcorders when they are constantly trying to adjust to changing composition. With higher frequency settings, the contemporary treatment of an image flickering randomly is very easy to create without the hassle of keyframing!

Deinterlace 

Deinterlace control offers a simple method for eliminating fields by interpolating one of the two fields (or both) to create a non-interlaced, progressive output. This is useful, for example, when the source or the input to the effect is interlaced, and the fast motion of objects cause jagged edges to appear and cause undesirable artifacts. 

  • None- Does not deinterlace the effect input 
  • Lower/Upper Only-  Uses either field (i.e. half a frame worth of information) to create a whole, progressive frame.
  • Merge- Create a progressive frame for each field, then combine the both. This is most useful for introducing a filmic look to an interlaced composition containing slowly moving objects.

Note: Various host applications offer built-in deinterlacers, often on a per clip basis. For example, Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro's  ‘Interpret Footage’ feature allows fields to be separated, if selected.  If the host’s deinterlacer is engaged and/or the effect’s input is no longer interlaced, select ‘None’ in this section.

  • Gamma –   There are three separate values for adjusting the Gamma values of the clip, one each for the red, green and blue channels.  The (R),(G) and (B) Gamma values affect the midrange luma scale of each color channel and the adjustments made here will affect how OverExpose works on the image further down as the values being fed into the effect will be changed.

Many parameters have both a vertical (V) and a horizontal (H) control.

Bloom Control 

  • Intensity (H), (V):  The Bloom Intensity parameter controls how much image 'smear'' happens in each direction during the blooming effect 
  • Saturation- This parameter controls how much color saturation is added or subtracted from the image content within the bloom effect.  The control range runs from -100 (complete desaturation of the bloom affected areas) to +100 (maximum added color saturation to the bloom affected areas. 

Note: adding excessive color saturation to this effect can produce image parameters that exceed legal, conventional broadcast limits.

  • Color:  Click on the color swatch to bring up a color picker dialogue, or use the eyedropper to pick a color directly from your image to tint the bloom effect.
  • Bloom Frequency (H), (V):  By controlling the frequency of the bloom, you change how often it happens.  (Frequency values are in Hertz, or the number of times per second.)  This controls the general pace and duration of the effect as it cycles’ lower values mean a slower occurrence of the effect, but also create a longer duration with each instance.
  • Bloom Amplitude (H), (V):  The Bloom Amplitude value controls the amount of modulation of the oscillation function that will form the ‘engine’ behind your self-animating bloom values.        The amplitude values are in 0 - 100 (percent).  At 100 (percent), up to the maximum Intensity values are applied to these oscillations.
  • Bloom Phase (H), (V):  If you think of the Bloom Frequency value as generating a sine wave that controls the cycling of the effect parameters, the ‘phase’ controls the synchronization with that wave (values range from -360 to +360 degrees. For example, H and V waves can be out of phase when they are 180 degrees ‘apart’.).
  • Bloom Chaos (H), (V):  Again, thinking about the cycling of the effect parameters being driven by a sine wave, predictability can be pretty obvious.  Introducing ‘chaos’ into the equation is like turning small children loose in a pet store…predictable? ...not so much.
  • Bloom Chaos Probability (H), (V):  Chaos reduces the predictability…probability controls the likelihood of the unpredictability…we’re working on making that more confusing…stand by. The Chaos Probability control goes from 0 - 100, scaled such that at lower values the oscillations are completely predictable and uniform (i.e. sinuous), while at higher values the oscillations become unpredictable and noisy, depending on how much Bloom Chaos values are set.  Chaos Probability essentially specifies how often the oscillations become corrupted over the duration of the composition.
  • Saturation Frequency:  By controlling the frequency of the saturation parameter, you change how often it happens.  This controls the general pace and duration of the effect as it cycles’ lower values mean a slower occurrence of the effect, but also create a longer duration with each instance.
  • Saturation Amplitude:  The Saturation Amplitude value controls the amount of modulation of the oscillation function that will form the ‘engine’ behind your self-animating saturation values.
  • Saturation Phase:  If you think of the Saturation Frequency value as generating a sine wave that controls the cycling of the effect parameters, the ‘phase’ controls the synchronization with that wave (values range from -360 to +360).
  • Saturation Chaos:  As in the case of Bloom frequency and chaos, the cycling of the effect parameters are driven by a sine wave. Chaos is the hammer to predictability’s…uh…egg.
  • Saturation Chaos Probability:  Chaos reduces the predictability…probability controls the liklihood of the unpredictability…the unpredictability increases the chaos…chaos reduces the….

Post Color Correct 

  • Post Gamma (R), (G), (B) - Adjust the Gamma of the clip downstream from the Bloom effect process.

Advanced

Sometimes the chaos values can introduce huge ‘spikes’ into the modulation oscillations.  The Chaos Adjustment values (-100… 0… +100 in percent) can tame these into a limited range. By default, we set these at 100 percent. At zero, chaos effects will be minimized. At negative values, modulation waveforms are inverted.

Skew

This effect takes its name from the control on many professional video tape recorders which would affect the tensioning of the ribbon of tape that wraps around the playback heads.  Altering the skew control during playback of video would cause various undesirable artifacts including image shearing, visual noise (or what a viewer might call “static”), vertical and horizontal hold issues, and more…

Color

  • Tint Color – Using the eyedropper, or by clicking on the color swatch, you can set a color value to tint your video.  Setting the value to white will have no discernible effect on our image as that is the ‘zero state’ of this property.  Moving the color value toward gray or a saturated color will have a visible effect on the image.
  • Brightness Lift – Slide this property into positive values to brighten your image, or into negative values to darken your image. 
  • Bright Variance –This control creates the range of deviation in the Brightness Lift value over time.  More variability (the range is from 0-100) will create more erratic light and dark fluctuations in your image.
  • Contrast – The Contrast value setting is similar to contrast settings in other software you have probably encountered.  The range is -50 to +50 with positive values increasing contrast, and negative values decreasing the contrast.
  • Contrast Variance – As with other Var (variable) controls in the Skew effect, this will determine the amount of variation in the contrast value allowed over time.  The more color and brightness change is introduced in this section, the more it affects the color flickering of the effect.   

Noise

Visual image noise is one of the typical symptoms of a defective analog video signal.  There are a variety of noise generators in Skew that are capable of very convincing results.

  • Noise Max – Introducing noise into your image can be used to portray maladjusted VCR tracking or a weak analog tuner signal.  Higher values create more noise.  The maximum value of 100 will create an image that appears to be faintly showing through video “snow.”
  • Noise Variance – When the Noise Max setting is above zero, the Noise Variance control will create fluctuations in the value of the Noise Max value over time.
  • Micro Noise – This control differs from the Noise Max control in that the noise generated from this control will not form into ‘bands’.  Micro noise will generate noise across the image evenly.
  • Noise Width – Noise Width can be used to introduce horizontal ‘smearing’ or ‘scratching’ type of noise defects, usually seen on old analog VTRs.
  • Noise Tempo – This is how often the noise will change. Larger numbers will cause the noise patterning to change LESS often (more frames between noise changes)  

Distortion

There are 2 components to the distortion which are combined together to give a single horizontal displacement value. The first component is defined by “Max Distortion” and the Tempo parameters. The second component is defined using 2 sine waves added together with a random value added in. These second components are controlled by the Amplitude, Frequency, Speed and Offset Variance parameters.

  • Distortion Min –This defines the minimum amount of horizontal distortion allowed. Larger number create more left-right distortions.  
  • Distortion Max –Similarly, the maximum amount is just that.

NOTE: the difference between the minimum and maximum value specifies the range of horizontal distortion allowed. Which means, if the two are identical, then the distortion will be very uniform. If the two are very different, then the distortions allowed can be any values in between to create a more natural effect.

  • Tempo Min – This is the minimum number of frames to hold a distortion phase. The distortion changes its value after a randomly selected number of frames between “Min Tempo” and “Max Tempo”. Larger values hold the distortion for a longer amount of time.
  • Max Tempo – This is the maximum number of frames to hold a distortion phase. The distortion changes its value after a randomly selected number of frames between ‘Min Tempo’ and ‘Max Tempo’.  Larger values hold the distortion for a longer amount of time.
  • Amplitude 1 – This controls the amplitude of the first sine-wave generator.
  • Amplitude 2 –This controls the amplitude of the second sine-wave generator.
  • Frequency 1 – This controls the frequency of the first sine-wave generator.
  • Frequency 2 –This controls the frequency of the second sine-wave generator.
  • Speed 1 –This controls the speed of the first sine-wave generator.
  • Speed 2 –This controls the speed of the second sine-wave generator.
  • Offset Variance – This adds a random value to the sine wave amplitude.

Glow 

Glow is intended to create a glow pattern around the video noise after it has been distorted which often occurs on older television receivers.

  • Glow Size –This defines the radius of the glow.
  • Glow Intensity – This controls the brightness of the glow.
  • Glow Threshold –This controls the minimum luminance value a pixel must have before it will begin to glow. Higher values prevent the darker portions of the image from glowing.

Ghosting 

Ghosting creates a horizontal visual ‘echo’ that simulates reflections and interference patterns of electromagnetic energy as it is transmitted through space to its reception point. There are at most 3 ghost patterns, and you can define the maximum “sway” with the Ghost Offset parameters. The Weight parameters define the opacity of the particular ghost image. Note that it’s possible to over-weight the ghost images, which will make the image brighter than the original.

  • Ghost Offset 1 –  Defines the maximum horizontal movement per frame of this ghost image.
  • Ghost Offset 2 –  Defines the maximum horizontal movement per frame of this ghost image.
  • Ghost Offset 3 –  Defines the maximum horizontal movement per frame of this ghost image.
  • Primary Weight – This is the opacity of the source (un-ghosted) signal.
  • Ghost 1 Weight – Controls the opacity of this ghost image.
  • Ghost 2 Weight – Controls the opacity of this ghost image.
  • Ghost 3 Weight – Controls the opacity of this ghost image.

Bars

This creates a dark bar that runs vertically on an image when it’s refresh phase is slightly different than the video capture device recording its screen. It’s a bit technical, but you can see the real-world effect easily yourself by recording a computer video monitor with a video camera.

  • Bar Height – Control the vertical size of your bars with this control.
  • Bar Ripple Frequency – The bars of distortion or black that roll through you footage have the ability to present an effect with many, small bars (lines really) in the picture, very close together.  The higher the frequency value, the smaller and closer spaced the lines become.
  • Bar Darkness – This controls how dark the bar is.  Larger values make a darker bar.

Vertical Hold

This simulates a malfunctioning vertical hold mechanism, or the loss of a vertical sync due to electromagnetic interference.  

  • Roll Probability – This defines the chance per frame that a vertical hold malfunction “roll” will occur. If it occurs, Roll Length defines the maximum number of frames that the vertical hold malfunction will last.
  • Roll Length – Defines the maximum duration of a vertical hold malfunction, expressed in frames.
  • Roll Speed – This defines the maximum speed that a the vertical hold will ‘roll.’

Wave Displace

This plug-in allows for complete control over wave distortion.

Wave Displace Controls

Number of Generators - Determines the number of distortions that are used in the wave patterns. The higher the value, the greater the distortion.

Edge Mode - Determines how the pixels will be filled along the edges of the image when the distortion moves the footage such that the footage below or background color can be viewed. By using one of these methods, the footage below will not show through.

  • Repeat Edge pixels - Repeats the pixel closest to the uncovered area. This will give a stretched look from the edge of the distorted footage to the edge of the comp.
  • Wrap Around - Uses pixels from the opposite side of the footage that have been distorted to replace the empty areas.
  • Reflect Edge Pixels - Uses a reflection of the closest pixels to the edge of the areas that are uncovered due to the effect. This is the setting used most often

Link H to V - Disables the horizontal controls and base the horizontal values off of the vertical controls.

Repeat Wave - Uses a wave shape to distort an image multiple times. For example, the wave effect will be applied once to the first frame, twice to the second frame, three to the third frame and so on. When enabled, quality must be set to High.

Repeat Amount - Determines the strength of the wave that is applied when Repeat Wave is enabled.

Random Seed - The seed value (start point) for any randomization that occurs in the plug-in. Do not animate this as it will cause the effect to jump or randomly change values and the animation will not be smooth.

H Wave Type - This defines the wave shape for the distortion.

  • Sine - Uses a sine wave as a distortion shape.
  • Square - A box wave distortion shape.
  • Triangle - A tent-shaped wave distortion shape.

H Min Amp - The minimum amplitude of the horizontal waves.

H Max Amp - The maximum amplitude of the horizontal waves.

H Min Frq - Determines the minimal number of times that the waves of distortion occur.

H Max Frq - Determines the maximum number of times that waves will occur along the horizontal axis. By using minimums and maximums for frequency and amplitude, non-uniform patterns of distortion can be created.

H Phase - Determines the position of the waves’ highs and lows (amplitude) along the lines of the waves (frequency).

V Min Amp - The minimum amplitude of the vertical waves

V Max Amp - The maximum amplitude of the vertical waves used in the distortion.

V Min Frq - Determines the minimal number of times that the waves of distortion occur.

V Max Frq - Determines the maximum number of times that waves will occur along the vertical axis.

V Phase - Determines the position of the waves’ highs and lows (amplitude) along the lines of the waves (frequency).

H Scale - Zooms into or out of the wave distortion effect along the horizontal axis.

V Scale - Zooms into or out of the wave distortion effect along the vertical axis.

Blend Original - Blends the unaffected original layer with the affected layer. The higher the value, the more of the original layer will be blended in with the affected footage.

Return to Part 1

DigiEffects Tools Have Been Used By:
Used by Paramount Pictures, CNN, WB, ESPN, Comedy Channel, HBO, Disney Channel, and MTV